How about paying for viewing films online?



In the wake of nearly a thousand people being booked for uploading and downloading Bachelor Party online, experts suggest that a paid service might be the only way out More than a thousand people were booked by the police for uploading as well as downloading the film Bachelor Party from the internet on Saturday. At the same time, several other films such as Ordinary and Grandmaster continue to be downloaded by lakhs of people and no cases are being registered. "The reason we could track down the offenders is that Bachelor Party has been protected by a specific anti-piracy software, which detects any upload on the Net," says its director Amal Neerad. "However, it's the company that has bought the video rights that really suffers; for, each download affects the CD sales. In the past many years, the video rights rates have come down, the major reason being piracy," he says. However, actor-director Prakash Bare, who has been instrumental in the introduction of the anti-piracy software in Mollywood, says that they have been able to stall downloads at 34,000 with the help of the software. "The major films which have signed up for the anti-piracy software are Bachelor Party, Spirit, Thattathin Marayathu, Ustad Hotel and Diamond Necklace. None of these films can be downloaded from the Internet." It's been nearly three months since the software was introduced in Mollywood. And the results have been positive, says Bare. "It's a challenge to combat piracy once the CD/DVD of a film is out on sale. Before the CD release of a protected film, we contact regular offenders, warn them and they usually keep away. Only if technology and law join hands can this menace be dealt with it better." Reportedly, B Unnikrishnan's Grandmaster has been released through Netflix, an online video streaming service in the US and Canada, thus making it the first such recent Malayalam film available on the stream. However, whether anyone would pay for it when the film is available on the net for free is another question. A major barrier in the anti-piracy drive is the attitude of the film fraternity who are not willing to accept changes, opines Bare. "People here sit quiet as though piracy is a way of life and nothing can be done about it, when the world over, changes are happening. In Hollywood, films are being sold on the Internet as paid service. However, instead of introducing the system here, we complain of piracy," says Bare, adding, "There are some 40 lakh non-resident Keralites who are eager to watch Malayalam films. Filmmakers tempt them with promos but give them no option to watch them. You can't blame them for downloading it from the Net. Why can't you give it to them legally, as a paid service?" he asks.
Source - Times Of India

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