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'A' films with minimum cuts post 11 pm on TV?

Jannat 2 
Since the screening of The Dirty Picture on television was stalled earlier this year because it was A-certified, and was later screened after 56 cuts, there has been a lot of debate about screening such films on television.

Even for Jannat 2, the Central Board of Film Certification (CBFC) has said that it can only be screened post 11pm and with proper cuts. However, the situation might improve. According to sources in the Broadcasting Content Complaints Council (BCCC), a meeting was held between CBFC representatives, the BCCC chairman retired Justice AP Shah, film industry representatives and broadcasters on September 19 in Mumbai, where it was felt that there should be a designated watershed hours post 11pm when A-certified movies can be screened with minimal cuts. There were talks about a proposition where viewers get to know the number of sexually explicit and violent scenes in the movie at the beginning.

"There were discussions about running a ticker at the beginning of the movie saying that this movie contains a particular number of scenes not fit for viewers under 18. This policy is prevalent in the US and the UK," a source in BCCC told us, adding that there are 20 films at the Mumbai centre of CBFC which are awaiting the approval of the Board for TV screening. This list includes Delhi Belly, Gangs Of Wasseypur (parts 1 and 2) and Jannat 2.

In the meeting, there were also discussions about creating a body comprising film industry representatives, TV broadcasters, BCCC representatives, Ministry of Information and Broadcasting officials and civil society members. "There were talks about creating a kind of self-regulatory mechanism where the above mentioned body can clear them for TV screening according to appropriate time slots," our source added. The only problem is the provisions of the Cinematograph Act, which prevent the screening of A-certified movies. "For A-rated movies, there will have to be amendments made to the Act which will entail long parliamentary proceedings and approvals. But efforts are on to strike a way out," the source said.

Source - Times Of India

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